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Old March 8th 19, 09:23 PM posted to alt.windows7.general,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.mobile
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_2_] J. P. Gilliver (John)[_2_] is offline
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In message , Roger Mills
writes:
On 08/03/2019 19:50, nospam wrote:
In , Java Jive
wrote:

[]
renovations, but, beforehand, I'd like to photograph the hand-painted
pictures that it contains. I had considered scanning it, but it's too
big, so some of the images would need to be scanned piecemeal, and I'm
worried that the book might not survive such rough handling as to be
perched on a scanner.


There are scanners that look like a mouse; the one I have is by LG, and
is model LSM-150, but there are others (I think LSM-100 is one). You
move them over the object to be scanned, and the software supplied with
stitches the sweeps together as you scan - up to A3 size IIRR is
claimed. For some reason they seem to have stopped making them, but you
can still find them - often unopened - on ebay and the like. I see no
reason why you should not be able to use them via a sheet of clear
plastic if you are worried about sliding the "mouse" over the images
(they work like an optical mouse, i. e. it uses the image itself to know
where it is, there are no little wheels involved). Work fine with
Windows 7, and I think earlier and later.

So I've decided to try and photograph it using my tablet. I'll
construct some sort of frame to hold the tablet securely a suitable
height over the book, and try and find a suitable source of
illumination. The need therefore is a way of controlling the tablet's
camera from a PC, either via WiFi, Bluetooth, or USB cable.


for the best results, don't use a tablet. use an slr and a copy stand
or better yet, have it scanned by a professional lab who specializes in
such things, who will have a scanner that's both big enough and
designed for books which won't damage it.

but if you're committed to doing it yourself with a tablet, just take


Yes, I did wonder why you can't use a camera. If this book is worth
enough to fund house developments, then even buying a camera ought not
to be out of the question - you can always sell it again afterwards; if
you buy second-hand (after all, you don't need modern gimmicks like face
recognition - and I suspect you don't need multi-megapixel, either: I'm
guessing these are to go on something like ebay), you shouldn't lose too
much. Or you could maybe hire one, but I have no knowledge of that.

the photos of each page using the tablet without involving the computer
at all, then after everything has been copied, connect the tablet to
the computer and copy all of the photos.


I would agree with all of that.

If you *must* use a tablet, why not control it with a selfie-stick
rather than trying to control it with a computer? Simply store all the
images (or batches thereof) on the tablet, and then transfer them using
a USB cable or FTP over WiFi.


And if you must use the tablet, with the software you have, then rather
than resetting it every time to put the images on D: where you want
them, let it put them where it wants on C:, and move them all in one go
afterwards.

Or am I missing something?

Or I (-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The desire to remain private and/or anonymous used to be a core British value,
but in recent times it has been treated with suspicion - an unfortunate by-
product of the widespread desire for fame. - Chris Middleton,
Computing 6 September 2011