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Old March 6th 18, 09:41 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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On Tue, 6 Mar 2018 07:44:58 +0000, Chris Green wrote:

Chris in Makati wrote:
On Mon, 5 Mar 2018 19:40:04 +0000, Chris Green wrote:

Rob Morley wrote:
A simple Google search for the two words gives the following result:

"Airplane" - 83,100,000 hits
"Aeroplane" - 20,500,000 hits

It's clear which of those forms has greater prevalence.

It's clear which word is more often spewed on the interwebs. I'm not
sure that's a particularly useful measure. But that wasn't the
question anyway.

Quite. The web != the world. Most of the places with large[ish]
British English speakers will have fewer computer users as they are in
many cases poorer countries. The USA has some of the highest densiity
of computer use and thus it's spellings will be over-represented.


I live in the Philippines, which is one those "poorer countries" with
a population of over 100 million. English is one of our official
languages and everyone here spells it "airplane".


That is the one 'other country' where they probably do use airplane.
I'm fairly sure the english speaking populations of India, Pakistan,
Nigeria, and just about all the other ones below on the Wikipedia list
would use aeroplane.


You're fairly sure? Browsing a couple of Indian and Pakistani
newspapers I find the following headlines on stories.

Here's a headline I found in the Times of India

"33 hours in airplane mode for PM Narendra Modi"

Here another one from The Nation, one of Pakistan's leading
newspapers.

"Balochistan CM airplane makes emergency landing"

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Old March 7th 18, 04:35 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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On Tuesday, 6 March 2018 18:53:22 UTC, Rob Morley wrote:
On Tue, 06 Mar 2018 10:03:31 +0800
Chris in Makati wrote:

On Mon, 5 Mar 2018 19:40:04 +0000, Chris Green wrote:


Quite. The web != the world. Most of the places with large[ish]
British English speakers will have fewer computer users as they are
in many cases poorer countries. The USA has some of the highest
densiity of computer use and thus it's spellings will be
over-represented.


I live in the Philippines, which is one those "poorer countries" with
a population of over 100 million. English is one of our official
languages and everyone here spells it "airplane".


That will be why he wrote "most" rather than "all". A history of US
isolationism has seen its influence mostly restricted to central
America, the Caribbean and militarily useful parts of the Pacific,
while Britain painted half the world map pink.


A quarter actually, and not necessarily all at the same time - the USA left before Oz was found.
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Old March 9th 18, 01:25 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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On 04/03/18 23:08, Chris in Makati wrote:
[snip]

A simple Google search for the two words gives the following result:

"Airplane" - 83,100,000 hits
"Aeroplane" - 20,500,000 hits

It's clear which of those forms has greater prevalence.

However much the Brits might like to think their influence in the
world still dominates, the reality is quite different.


Just because the majority of people in the world can't tell the
difference between a spade and a shovel doesn't turn a spade into a shovel.

--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
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Old March 9th 18, 07:20 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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"MissRiaElaine" wrote in message
news
On 04/03/18 23:08, Chris in Makati wrote:
[snip]

A simple Google search for the two words gives the following
result:

"Airplane" - 83,100,000 hits
"Aeroplane" - 20,500,000 hits

It's clear which of those forms has greater prevalence.

However much the Brits might like to think their influence in the
world still dominates, the reality is quite different.


Just because the majority of people in the world can't tell the
difference between a spade and a shovel doesn't turn a spade into a
shovel.

--



....until you trip over it!



--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


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Old March 10th 18, 03:00 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Woody wrote:

"MissRiaElaine" wrote in message
news
On 04/03/18 23:08, Chris in Makati wrote:
[snip]

A simple Google search for the two words gives the following
result:

"Airplane" - 83,100,000 hits
"Aeroplane" - 20,500,000 hits

It's clear which of those forms has greater prevalence.

However much the Brits might like to think their influence in the
world still dominates, the reality is quite different.


Just because the majority of people in the world can't tell the
difference between a spade and a shovel doesn't turn a spade into a
shovel.

--



...until you trip over it!


That's the rake!



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Old March 10th 18, 05:17 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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"Chris" wrote in message
news
Woody wrote:

"MissRiaElaine" wrote in
message
news
On 04/03/18 23:08, Chris in Makati wrote:
[snip]

A simple Google search for the two words gives the following
result:

"Airplane" - 83,100,000 hits
"Aeroplane" - 20,500,000 hits

It's clear which of those forms has greater prevalence.

However much the Brits might like to think their influence in the
world still dominates, the reality is quite different.

Just because the majority of people in the world can't tell the
difference between a spade and a shovel doesn't turn a spade into
a
shovel.

--



...until you trip over it!


That's the rake!


No, up here in't north we call a spade a spade until you trip over it
then its a bloody shovel!


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


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Old March 11th 18, 04:24 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Woody wrote:

"Chris" wrote in message
news
Woody wrote:

"MissRiaElaine" wrote in
message
news On 04/03/18 23:08, Chris in Makati wrote:
[snip]

A simple Google search for the two words gives the following
result:

"Airplane" - 83,100,000 hits
"Aeroplane" - 20,500,000 hits

It's clear which of those forms has greater prevalence.

However much the Brits might like to think their influence in the
world still dominates, the reality is quite different.

Just because the majority of people in the world can't tell the
difference between a spade and a shovel doesn't turn a spade into
a
shovel.

--


...until you trip over it!


That's the rake!


No, up here in't north we call a spade a spade until you trip over it
then its a bloody shovel!


Not aware of that colloquialism. I've simply watched too many tom and jerry
cartoons

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Old March 11th 18, 05:34 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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In article , MissRiaElaine wrote:
What's an "airplane"..?

I've heard of aeroplanes, or aircraft, is this a new sort..?


Not a VERY new sort ...

"Airplane" shouldn't be unfamiliar. I have a copy of "The Observer's
Book of Airplanes" that was bought for 4/- by my late father in about
1942 (the year of its publication). It was printed in Great Britain and
bears a British Copyright.

[I see from the web that it's worth several hundred times that, now!]

It contains some illustrations, etc., for which credit is given to "The
Aeroplane" (evidently a periodical of the time), but no mention is made
of the different spellings of "Airplane" and "Aeroplane", so I think
the editors must have felt that the two spellings were both familiar
enough to require no explanation .

I'm surprised, though, that my Shorter Oxford, from 2000 or so, doesn't
give "Airplane" its own entry, nor does it give it as an alternative
spelling under "Aeroplane", but does list it as a compound word under
the entry for "Air", where it is said to be "(now chiefly N.Amer.)".

That's "chiefly N.Amer.", not "exclusively N.Amer".

--
Cheers,
Daniel.


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Old March 11th 18, 10:10 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Daniel James wrote:
In article , MissRiaElaine wrote:
What's an "airplane"..?

I've heard of aeroplanes, or aircraft, is this a new sort..?


Not a VERY new sort ...

"Airplane" shouldn't be unfamiliar. I have a copy of "The Observer's
Book of Airplanes" that was bought for 4/- by my late father in about
1942 (the year of its publication). It was printed in Great Britain and
bears a British Copyright.

[I see from the web that it's worth several hundred times that, now!]

It contains some illustrations, etc., for which credit is given to "The
Aeroplane" (evidently a periodical of the time),


Not only then, but still currently. My dad buys it on occasion.
http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com


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Old March 12th 18, 09:29 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2018 18:34:32 Daniel James wrote:

In article , MissRiaElaine wrote:
What's an "airplane"..?

I've heard of aeroplanes, or aircraft, is this a new sort..?


Not a VERY new sort ...

I'm surprised, though, that my Shorter Oxford, from 2000 or so, doesn't
give "Airplane" its own entry, nor does it give it as an alternative
spelling under "Aeroplane", but does list it as a compound word under
the entry for "Air", where it is said to be "(now chiefly N.Amer.)".

That's "chiefly N.Amer.", not "exclusively N.Amer".


My 1956 Concise Oxford Dictionary gives exactly the same apart from the
fact that it says that "aeroplane" is "NOT U.S."

Interestingly my mail editor does not have "aeroplane" listed in its
spell checker. I presume that's because the spell checker is American
even though my mail editor was developed in the UK!

David

--
David Rance writing from Caversham, Reading, UK


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