UK Mobile Phones (uk.telecom.mobile) Mobile telephone equipment and networks.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11   Report Post  
Old November 9th 18, 02:02 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Mar 2017
Posts: 69
Default 5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three

On 08/11/2018 11:41, NY wrote:
"Java Jive" wrote in message
news
5G hyping getting into its stride ...

"5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three"

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-46127712

Actually, out here in northern Scotland, 4G could already make my
landline redundant if only there was a suitably priced plan that gave
me unlimited or nearly so download limits, but AFAIAA there isn't.


Yes there are two critical things that are needed before you can even
*think* about ditching your landline:

- good coverage of mobile signal
- affordable tariff, comparable with what you would pay for landline
broadband

At present we have neither. Mobile coverage, even for simple phone
calls, let alone fast data, is patchy where I live. Mobile data tariffs
exist, but they still tend to be limited in terms of how much data you
can access per month, and they tend to be more expensive.

But this will change.


But probably only in the areas already well served by fast fixed lines.

I can't see rural North Yorkshire ever getting past 3G until hell
freezes over. Plenty are still on 2.5G and one bar of signal on a good
day if you are lucky. People here are used to balancing their phone on a
vase in the right window to gat any kind of mobile signal at all.


I just hope that the phone companies don't blow all their money
upgrading mobile/data coverage for the people who already have a fairly
fast connection, and neglect the people in more rural areas who can't
even get 100% reliable phone call and slow data coverage.


To the haves shall be given ever more at the expense of the have nots.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown

  #12   Report Post  
Old November 9th 18, 05:45 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband,uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Aug 2008
Posts: 489
Default 5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three

Martin Brown wrote:
On 08/11/2018 11:41, NY wrote:
"Java Jive" wrote in message
news
5G hyping getting into its stride ...

"5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three"

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-46127712

Actually, out here in northern Scotland, 4G could already make my
landline redundant if only there was a suitably priced plan that gave
me unlimited or nearly so download limits, but AFAIAA there isn't.


Yes there are two critical things that are needed before you can even
*think* about ditching your landline:

- good coverage of mobile signal
- affordable tariff, comparable with what you would pay for landline
broadband

At present we have neither. Mobile coverage, even for simple phone
calls, let alone fast data, is patchy where I live. Mobile data tariffs
exist, but they still tend to be limited in terms of how much data you
can access per month, and they tend to be more expensive.

But this will change.


But probably only in the areas already well served by fast fixed lines.

I can't see rural North Yorkshire ever getting past 3G until hell
freezes over. Plenty are still on 2.5G and one bar of signal on a good
day if you are lucky. People here are used to balancing their phone on a
vase in the right window to gat any kind of mobile signal at all.


Isn't that because of the moors national park? I can imagine putting masts
on/near there is not possible.

  #13   Report Post  
Old November 9th 18, 08:10 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband,uk.telecom.mobile
NY NY is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Jan 2014
Posts: 34
Default 5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three

"Chris" wrote in message
news
I can't see rural North Yorkshire ever getting past 3G until hell
freezes over. Plenty are still on 2.5G and one bar of signal on a good
day if you are lucky. People here are used to balancing their phone on a
vase in the right window to gat any kind of mobile signal at all.


Isn't that because of the moors national park? I can imagine putting masts
on/near there is not possible.


No, even in the villages of Ryedale, away from any planning restrictions of
Dales and Moors national parks, reception is bloody awful. It is common to
lose a call or get garbled, intermittent phone calls when driving around -
even on the main A64 trunk road, let alone in villages. I accept that where
there are three cottages and a farm - and nothing for several miles -
reception may be bad. But in areas where there's no more than a mile or so
in any direction between one village and the next, and in a market town of
several thousand people, there ought to be good coverage. And there's not. I
know well that there is no coverage on one side of our house (but fairly
good on the other) so I have to constrain myself to one side of the house
when I make receive a mobile call. And if I go shopping, there is no
coverage whatsoever at the supermarket if I ever need to phone my wife to
say "they haven't got X, so will Y do instead". And I'm *very* used to the
"not registered on network" error :-(

  #14   Report Post  
Old November 13th 18, 09:39 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband,uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Mar 2017
Posts: 69
Default 5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three

On 09/11/2018 17:45, Chris wrote:
Martin Brown wrote:
On 08/11/2018 11:41, NY wrote:
"Java Jive" wrote in message
news 5G hyping getting into its stride ...

"5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three"

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-46127712

Actually, out here in northern Scotland, 4G could already make my
landline redundant if only there was a suitably priced plan that gave
me unlimited or nearly so download limits, but AFAIAA there isn't.

Yes there are two critical things that are needed before you can even
*think* about ditching your landline:

- good coverage of mobile signal
- affordable tariff, comparable with what you would pay for landline
broadband

At present we have neither. Mobile coverage, even for simple phone
calls, let alone fast data, is patchy where I live. Mobile data tariffs
exist, but they still tend to be limited in terms of how much data you
can access per month, and they tend to be more expensive.

But this will change.


But probably only in the areas already well served by fast fixed lines.

I can't see rural North Yorkshire ever getting past 3G until hell
freezes over. Plenty are still on 2.5G and one bar of signal on a good
day if you are lucky. People here are used to balancing their phone on a
vase in the right window to gat any kind of mobile signal at all.


Isn't that because of the moors national park? I can imagine putting masts
on/near there is not possible.


Actually there are quite a few big antennas around here - BMEWS Site 3
for instance and various other microwave link infrastructure dating back
to the cold war. Some mobile network nodes are colocated with existing
telecoms infrastructure sites and on hills either side of the major
roads but topography means that there are dead spots (even when the
range based mobile coverage maps say everything is fine).

Snag is that high frequency radio waves need strict line of sight and
don't bend round hills very much - just a bit of Fresnel diffraction.
You get patches where the signal comes and goes nd it ll br aks p.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #15   Report Post  
Old November 13th 18, 09:46 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Mar 2017
Posts: 69
Default 5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three

On 08/11/2018 15:29, MissRiaElaine wrote:
On 08/11/2018 09:19, Java Jive wrote:
5G hyping getting into its stride ...

"5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three"

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-46127712

Actually, out here in northern Scotland, 4G could already make my
landline redundant if only there was a suitably priced plan that gave
me unlimited or nearly so download limits, but AFAIAA there isn't.


I just don't like the concept of relying on radio connections for
*everything* - there is just a certain satisfying something about a
fixed pair of wires, maybe it's just me.


Increasingly where I live in North Yorkshire the people who depend on a
decent quality fast internet connection are switching to a peer to peer
microwave based network for internet, mobile phone for voice and
ditching their landline entirely. Why pay an extra line rental charge
when the service it offers is worse than second rate?

I only need to find another four takers for the service in my village
and it will be possible to have a rebroadcast node here. I have seen a
similar system in parts of the Lake District. The only limitation is
that you need strict line of sight to a node to get a connection.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown


  #16   Report Post  
Old November 13th 18, 06:20 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband,uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Aug 2008
Posts: 489
Default 5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three

Martin Brown wrote:
On 09/11/2018 17:45, Chris wrote:
Martin Brown wrote:
On 08/11/2018 11:41, NY wrote:
"Java Jive" wrote in message
news 5G hyping getting into its stride ...

"5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three"

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-46127712

Actually, out here in northern Scotland, 4G could already make my
landline redundant if only there was a suitably priced plan that gave
me unlimited or nearly so download limits, but AFAIAA there isn't.

Yes there are two critical things that are needed before you can even
*think* about ditching your landline:

- good coverage of mobile signal
- affordable tariff, comparable with what you would pay for landline
broadband

At present we have neither. Mobile coverage, even for simple phone
calls, let alone fast data, is patchy where I live. Mobile data tariffs
exist, but they still tend to be limited in terms of how much data you
can access per month, and they tend to be more expensive.

But this will change.

But probably only in the areas already well served by fast fixed lines.

I can't see rural North Yorkshire ever getting past 3G until hell
freezes over. Plenty are still on 2.5G and one bar of signal on a good
day if you are lucky. People here are used to balancing their phone on a
vase in the right window to gat any kind of mobile signal at all.


Isn't that because of the moors national park? I can imagine putting masts
on/near there is not possible.


Actually there are quite a few big antennas around here - BMEWS Site 3
for instance and various other microwave link infrastructure dating back
to the cold war. Some mobile network nodes are colocated with existing
telecoms infrastructure sites and on hills either side of the major
roads but topography means that there are dead spots (even when the
range based mobile coverage maps say everything is fine).

Snag is that high frequency radio waves need strict line of sight and
don't bend round hills very much - just a bit of Fresnel diffraction.
You get patches where the signal comes and goes nd it ll br aks p.


Sorry. Can you speak up? Didn't catch the last bit...

  #17   Report Post  
Old November 17th 18, 04:15 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Dec 2015
Posts: 86
Default 5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three

On Thu, 8 Nov 2018 12:05:14 +0000, Java Jive
wrote:

On 08/11/2018 11:41, NY wrote:

I just hope that the phone companies don't blow all their money
upgrading mobile/data coverage for the people who already have a fairly
fast connection, and neglect the people in more rural areas who can't
even get 100% reliable phone call and slow data coverage.


Which, of course, is exactly what will happen under the current
laissez-faire non-management of hands-off-com. What is needed at very
least is a regime where telecoms operators have to finish rolling out nG
to the entire population before they are allowed to commence rolling out
(n+1)G, but this never, ever seems to happen !-(


Providing mobile coverage to absolutely everyone is never going to
happen, nor should it be necessary to do so. In some areas it's
totally uneconomic to install cellsites when all that's in the
coverage area are a handful of people and a few sheep.
  #18   Report Post  
Old November 17th 18, 07:18 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Feb 2016
Posts: 70
Default 5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three

Chris in Makati wrote:
On Thu, 8 Nov 2018 12:05:14 +0000, Java Jive
wrote:

On 08/11/2018 11:41, NY wrote:

I just hope that the phone companies don't blow all their money
upgrading mobile/data coverage for the people who already have a fairly
fast connection, and neglect the people in more rural areas who can't
even get 100% reliable phone call and slow data coverage.


Which, of course, is exactly what will happen under the current
laissez-faire non-management of hands-off-com. What is needed at very
least is a regime where telecoms operators have to finish rolling out nG
to the entire population before they are allowed to commence rolling out
(n+1)G, but this never, ever seems to happen !-(


Providing mobile coverage to absolutely everyone is never going to
happen, nor should it be necessary to do so. In some areas it's
totally uneconomic to install cellsites when all that's in the
coverage area are a handful of people and a few sheep.


But shouldn’t the aim to be to provide coverage to everywhere rather than
everyone? It is, after all, a mobile system. As an end user, I’d like to
see my mobile operate everywhere, just in case I happen to end up in your
place with one person and half a dozen sheep and need to make a call/
received data etc. Clearly, 100% coverage is never going to happen, but it
should be a goal. There must be lots of sites that on their own are
uneconomic, but add to the utility of the system, which in itself is
economic.

  #19   Report Post  
Old November 17th 18, 09:31 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Nov 2012
Posts: 65
Default 5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three

On 17/11/2018 04:15, Chris in Makati wrote:

Providing mobile coverage to absolutely everyone is never going to
happen, nor should it be necessary to do so. In some areas it's
totally uneconomic to install cellsites when all that's in the
coverage area are a handful of people and a few sheep.


The emergency services are going to replace their current TETRA system
with a 4G network. Are you saying that they should'n't be able to
communicate in low population areas? If a farmer gets injured by his
livestock or his machinery some distance from his landline and cannot
walk to it, should (s)he not be able to phone for help?
  #20   Report Post  
Old November 17th 18, 09:49 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Dec 2014
Posts: 23
Default 5G will let users ditch fixed-line home broadband, says Three

Java Jive wrote:
On 17/11/2018 04:15, Chris in Makati wrote:

Providing mobile coverage to absolutely everyone is never going to
happen, nor should it be necessary to do so. In some areas it's
totally uneconomic to install cellsites when all that's in the
coverage area are a handful of people and a few sheep.


The emergency services are going to replace their current TETRA system
with a 4G network.* Are you saying that they should'n't be able to
communicate in low population areas?* If a farmer gets injured by his
livestock or his machinery some distance from his landline and cannot
walk to it, should (s)he not be able to phone for help?


Farmers have historically fitted 2-way radios in vehicles to cover
exactly this sort of emergency.

However, many agricultural vehicles require an internet connection to
operate and arrange maintenance and the like, so a 3G/4G/5G service is
virtually essential. The same applies to "smart meters" for electricity
(and presumably gas). Many houses can't get any sort of mobile phone
signal inside where the meters are installed - in my house for example
the only place where a mobile phone gets a signal is on a north-facing
windowsill. I live a few miles from Thetford, so not a remote rural
location!

If having a mobile phone or an internet connection improves the
efficiency of a variety of services, then some part of the cost of
providing the phone or internet should be borne by the services gaining
the advantage. This might then make it practical to increase coverage;
but it would probably require legislation to ensure a universal service
obligation.

--
Graham J





Reply
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is the Three "One Plan" OK to replace fixed line broadband? Adam Lipscombe[_2_] UK Mobile Phones 7 December 22nd 11 04:45 PM
3G/GPRS for "fixed" broadband? Robin Faichney UK Mobile Phones 14 April 19th 06 05:07 PM
let's try another subject line Reestit Mutton UK Mobile Phones 7 February 9th 05 01:13 PM
Orange ditch chart music Kevin UK Mobile Phones 5 November 10th 03 11:28 AM
Cost of calling a THREE mobile from a fixed line and THREE BILLING (by the second)? PaulClarkeDenby UK Mobile Phones 1 August 8th 03 10:04 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:20 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 Mobile Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about UK mobile phones"

 

Copyright © 2017