UK Mobile Phones (uk.telecom.mobile) Mobile telephone equipment and networks.

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Old November 28th 18, 05:30 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
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Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

On 11/28/2018 9:21 AM, NY wrote:

Depends whether there are other routers that use the same channel within
interference range. That would slow things down down a lot if there are
collisions.


My neighbor's WiFi was (of course) on the same 2.4 GHz channel as mine
so I moved my WiFi to the other end of the band. I didn't have any
noticeable problems before the move but thought it would be a good idea.
I still don't have any noticeable problems...

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Old November 28th 18, 06:30 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
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Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

"nospam" wrote in message
...
use the same ssid for both and it will intelligently switch.


I did do this to see if it made any difference. Both with same and different
"wibble_2.4" and "wibble_5", the iPad always seemed to prefer weak 5 GHz
over strong 2.4. Our various Android phones seemed to be more sensible and
looked at signal strength as well.

some wifi routers can adjust the threshold at which it switches.


Surely it's the client device not the router which chooses.

ideally, set up one or more 5ghz wifi access points elsewhere in the
house, wherever it's needed. mesh units make this *very* easy but
non-mesh units will also work.


And find a way to get the network signal from the router to the repeater
access points. Probably not by wifi, because that will result in a reduction
of data rate when a device is using a repeater. So you are left with
Homeplug (annoys radio hams) or laying Ethernet cable (have to clear it with
SWMBO).

When wifi repeaters are used, is it better to have the repeater on a
different SSID and channel to the main router wifi, or on the same values? I
never know. Instinct would suggest that different channel at least (and
maybe different SSID) would avoid interference between main and repeater.

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Old November 28th 18, 06:48 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
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Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

Most ISP provided modems are capable of 5GHz operation and 802.11n these
days - maybe you should ask your ISP to replace your antidiluvian unit.


The 5 GHz band is too problematic. Only channels 36, 40, 44, 48 are
reliable (in Europe). The rest of the channels between 52-144 are
subject to DFS. In America you also have a few channels above 149.

In the case of some devices the manufacturer only implements 36-48
channels because it's the simplest way of complying with EU/US/Japan
regulations.

When your router/AP believes a plane is passing by, I don't understand
very well what it happens; either the router swichs to other cahnnel
or it interrupts emissions in the 5Ghz band. Possibly that depends on
the router/AP. And that can last for half hour after the plane has
passed by.
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Old November 28th 18, 06:49 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
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Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

In article , NY
wrote:

use the same ssid for both and it will intelligently switch.


I did do this to see if it made any difference. Both with same and different
"wibble_2.4" and "wibble_5", the iPad always seemed to prefer weak 5 GHz
over strong 2.4. Our various Android phones seemed to be more sensible and
looked at signal strength as well.


generally, 5 ghz is preferred, even if the signal is weaker. what
matters is throughput.

some wifi routers can adjust the threshold at which it switches.


Surely it's the client device not the router which chooses.


it's a mix of both, however, some routers have custom settings:
<https://i.imgur.com/sDMmciZ.jpg

ideally, set up one or more 5ghz wifi access points elsewhere in the
house, wherever it's needed. mesh units make this *very* easy but
non-mesh units will also work.


And find a way to get the network signal from the router to the repeater
access points. Probably not by wifi, because that will result in a reduction
of data rate when a device is using a repeater. So you are left with
Homeplug (annoys radio hams) or laying Ethernet cable (have to clear it with
SWMBO).


mesh is not the same as a repeater.

with mesh, there is little to no reduction in throughput because there
is an additional wireless backchannel. put them wherever needed. no
need to run additional cables.
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Old November 28th 18, 06:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
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Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

In article , Alfred
wrote:

When your router/AP believes a plane is passing by, I don't understand
very well what it happens; either the router swichs to other cahnnel
or it interrupts emissions in the 5Ghz band. Possibly that depends on
the router/AP. And that can last for half hour after the plane has
passed by.


unless the plane is very low and intentionally trying to jam wifi, no.


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Old November 28th 18, 07:34 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
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In uk.telecom.broadband nospam wrote:
In article , Alfred
wrote:

When your router/AP believes a plane is passing by, I don't understand
very well what it happens; either the router swichs to other cahnnel
or it interrupts emissions in the 5Ghz band. Possibly that depends on
the router/AP. And that can last for half hour after the plane has
passed by.


unless the plane is very low and intentionally trying to jam wifi, no.


You don't need planes to have problems. For example, when you power
up the router/AP, it will take 20 minutes to start transmitting in
that channel. And there can also be false positives. The ISPs don't
want to receive complains to their customer service telling them that
the 5 GHz band doesnt' work and they just disable the 52-144 channels
altogether.

If you run an scan in your neighbourhood, you'll see that the 52-144
channels are empty. Which turns out to be a good thing for tech-savvy
people who know what is happening, even if the regulators didn't
intend that.
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Old November 28th 18, 08:29 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
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Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

In article , Alfred
wrote:

When your router/AP believes a plane is passing by, I don't understand
very well what it happens; either the router swichs to other cahnnel
or it interrupts emissions in the 5Ghz band. Possibly that depends on
the router/AP. And that can last for half hour after the plane has
passed by.


unless the plane is very low and intentionally trying to jam wifi, no.


You don't need planes to have problems.


you mentioned planes.

For example, when you power
up the router/AP, it will take 20 minutes to start transmitting in
that channel.


something is very, very wrong with your router.

most wifi routers boot in a minute or so, often less, and the only
reason to reboot it is for a firmware update or moving it to a new
location, so the boot time does not matter.

And there can also be false positives. The ISPs don't
want to receive complains to their customer service telling them that
the 5 GHz band doesnt' work and they just disable the 52-144 channels
altogether.


the isp can't disable anything on a wifi router that the isp did not
provide.

If you run an scan in your neighbourhood, you'll see that the 52-144
channels are empty. Which turns out to be a good thing for tech-savvy
people who know what is happening, even if the regulators didn't
intend that.


that depends on a lot of things. since most routers dynamically switch
channels, most channels, if not all of them, will be in use.
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Old November 28th 18, 10:32 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
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Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

In article , Alfred
wrote:

For example, when you power
up the router/AP, it will take 20 minutes to start transmitting in
that channel.


something is very, very wrong with your router.

most wifi routers boot in a minute or so, often less, and the only
reason to reboot it is for a firmware update or moving it to a new
location, so the boot time does not matter.


That depends on which channel you use and the regulations in your
country. In some cases it can take up to 10 minutes (channels 120-128).
I was only off by a factor of 2 in the waiting time in my previous post.


nope.

booting should be in the range of a minute or so.

it might switch channels later, but that's separate.
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Old November 28th 18, 11:41 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
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Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

In article , Alfred
wrote:

That depends on which channel you use and the regulations in your
country. In some cases it can take up to 10 minutes (channels 120-128).


nope.

booting should be in the range of a minute or so.

it might switch channels later, but that's separate.


You reply too fast, without reading what people writes.


i read it.

Booting time for a modern router is very fast, just a couple of
seconds.


again, no. booting is about a minute, depending on the router.

The problem is the time it takes to begin transmitting
when you pick a certain fixed channel in the 5 GHz band.


don't pick a fixed channel.

If you choose channel 'auto', the router will most likely start
broadcasting immediately at the 36, 40, 44 or 48 channels, which are
not subjected to DFS.


in other words, not an issue. dfs channels may be delayed, but some
routers have zero-wait dfs.

Choosing a fixed channel is a sane thing to do in the 2.4 GHz band.
A lot of people run a frequency scan, and pick a frequency that is not
used by the neighbours, but in the 5 GHz band you need to be aware of
what happens in the DFS channels.


choosing a fixed channel is rarely the best thing to do, regardless of
band.

with the access point on automatic, it can dynamically switch channels
as needed, depending on changing conditions.

As I said before, this trap has caught professional network
administrators in the past, when 5 GHz wifi was a new thing. I am
sure many non-professionals are falling in it nowadays doing setup of
their home routers.


set the router to automatic and don't worry about it.
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Old November 29th 18, 02:44 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,comp.mobile.android,uk.telecom.broadband
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Default Mobile faster than wi-fi in many countries

On 28/11/2018 17.03, Martin Brown wrote:
On 28/11/2018 13:03, Carlos E.R. wrote:
On 28/11/2018 12.57, Martin Brown wrote:


My own 3G connection will run 20Mbps at home whereas my best fixed line
is 5M and for most rural domestic users round here 1-2M is more typical.
So apart from the data charges which sting a little 3G is way faster
(and 4G is a distant pipe dream - most masts here are still EDGE 2.5G).


Well, my WiFi does at most 45 Mbit (with a 600 Mbit land line). So 4G,
with a theoretical speed of 301Mbit, is faster than my WiFi - unless
there are many phones in the area actively using internet, because the
speed is shared.


That seems insanely slow WiFi speed for such a fast landline.


Indeed, but it is what most providers provide.


Many people have such slow WiFi. And even slower if living on a flat
(apartment): 1 MB is typical.


If there are zillions of users all fighting for the same channel 11 as
BT used to by default set them up to do then you can get a huge slowdown
due to collisions. I persuaded my nearest neighbours to use channels so
that people on the same channel are separated as widely as possible.


Oh, at that place there are so many neighbours all using WiFi that all
channels are used by more than one apartment.


Yes, it is possible to purchase access points using 5 Gh and improve
speed.


Most ISP provided modems are capable of 5GHz operation and 802.11n these
days - maybe you should ask your ISP to replace your antidiluvian unit.


Oh, they will. They are replacing them, forcibly, and charging extra,
which I do not want. I do not know if the new model does 5G - I'll
google. [...] Yes, it has 5G. But apparently only for new clients, not
guaranteed they install it if we complain.

<https://comunidad.movistar.es/t5/Blog-Movisfera/Telef%C3%B3nica-sustituye-router-ONT-y-videobridge-por-un-nuevo/ba-p/2505790

--
Cheers, Carlos.


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