UK Mobile Phones (uk.telecom.mobile) Mobile telephone equipment and networks.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11   Report Post  
Old May 20th 19, 05:19 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Nov 2015
Posts: 109
Default Phone charger question

Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting. Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe? I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find). The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not. It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine. Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up? Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?



It's not unreasonable to be a little paranoid about this issue, the
following is chiefly about UK plugs and sockets.

The plug on every item we connect to the mains has to contain a
suitably rated fuse accessible to the user, but for some reason
wall-warts are exempt, so we have to take them on trust to have
suitable internal protection.

After all, when you plug your charger into a so-called 13A socket, it
is typically protected by a 32 amp breaker and therefore capable of
supplying about 7.5kW continuously.




--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%

  #12   Report Post  
Old May 20th 19, 06:18 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Jul 2018
Posts: 164
Default Phone charger question

On 20/05/2019 18:19, Graham. wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting. Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe? I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find). The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not. It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine. Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up? Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?



It's not unreasonable to be a little paranoid about this issue, the
following is chiefly about UK plugs and sockets.

The plug on every item we connect to the mains has to contain a
suitably rated fuse accessible to the user, but for some reason
wall-warts are exempt, so we have to take them on trust to have
suitable internal protection.

After all, when you plug your charger into a so-called 13A socket, it
is typically protected by a 32 amp breaker and therefore capable of
supplying about 7.5kW continuously.


That's something that has always worried me more than a little. I tend
to use a 4-way strip to power my chargers, at least that has a fused plug.


--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
  #13   Report Post  
Old May 21st 19, 11:04 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Nov 2010
Posts: 498
Default Phone charger question

On Mon, 20 May 2019 18:19:35 +0100, Graham.
wrote:
[snip}

The plug on every item we connect to the mains has to contain a
suitably rated fuse accessible to the user, but for some reason
wall-warts are exempt, so we have to take them on trust to have
suitable internal protection.

After all, when you plug your charger into a so-called 13A socket, it
is typically protected by a 32 amp breaker and therefore capable of
supplying about 7.5kW continuously.


I thought of that. I have a Schuko socket, which I limited to a 2A
fuse (FCU) rather than the 13A that the electrician fitted.
  #14   Report Post  
Old May 21st 19, 11:07 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Nov 2010
Posts: 498
Default Phone charger question

On Mon, 20 May 2019 18:19:35 +0100, Graham.
wrote:
[snip]

Update: I took the charger to my local coffee house, where the
waitress is much younger than me! She could read all the markings,
which seemed okay, including the code inside the USB port. All the
evidence seems to be pointing in the right direction.
  #15   Report Post  
Old May 21st 19, 01:15 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Mar 2017
Posts: 98
Default Phone charger question

On 19/05/2019 21:26, Scott wrote:
On Sun, 19 May 2019 19:08:34 -0000 (UTC), Chris
wrote:

Martin Brown wrote:
On 19/05/2019 16:04, Scott wrote:
On Sun, 19 May 2019 12:38:50 +0000 (UTC), Tweed
wrote:

Scott wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting. Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe? I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find). The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not. It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine. Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up? Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?


I don’t think so. It is trivial to fake the outer case markings (though
they sometimes get that wrong!). Most supplies are tightly sealed shut, so
you can’t take the lid off to look inside. If you are dealing with Apple
stuff, and I assume you are given the reference to an Apple technician, the
easiest solution is to take it to the Apple shop and pay £8 to have it
swapped with a known good Apple unit from their stock. With power supplies
you have to have confidence in the supply chain and/or brand. It’s a bit
like why the likes of Sainsbury’s sprang up in Victorian times, so that
customers could have confidence that goods in their shops had not been
adulterated because of the need to preserve Sainsbury’s reputation. The
food might have been a bit more expensive than the local corner shop, but
you had greater confidence in what you were getting. I know I might sound a
bit paranoid on this subject, but just consider that within the very small
volume of your charger you have 230v mains one side, normally fused at 32A
in the ring circuit, and around 5v on the output. Designed and constructed
properly it is not a problem. The trouble is properly is a lot harder than
it first appears, and even harder if your bill of materials budget is half
a farthing.

Thanks. I considered that but the problem it that it's a two pin
(Euro) version not sold in the UK that I wanted for travel purposes.
Maybe I could swap it at the destination for 10 Euro or something. .

It may be easier to buy one at the destination


Yep. Cheaper too. I've got a few I've bought over the years.

Adapters are fine but add bulk to the plug which may cause problems
plugging it in. Especially in the US as their sockets are really flimsy.

or rely on hotels having
USB charge points in the rooms. Many of them do these days.


Too many hotels don't which it makes it quite a risky exercise.


I always carry a charger for the destination and extra short leads (plus
a small power store device).

Is there any concern about voltage regulation on a USB port? The
manufacturers usually advise using the correct power supply for the
device.


Generally no. The control loop either works or it doesn't and they are
usually designed to crowbar to no output at all in a fault condition.

The problem with some of the dodgy cheap Chinese ones is that the DC
output may not be isolated from the mains so in some failed states it
could result in the entire device being at mains potential.

You have to be a bit more careful with high speed chargers.

Although the manufacturers advise only to use their charger the units
are mostly interoperable, but with slower charging if the device cannot
exploit any of the faster modes that the specific charger offers.

I have had manufacturer's original chargers fail or develop faults where
they will not recognise their same brand counterpart that is supported
for a fast charge mode any more (this fault seems all too common).

--
Regards,
Martin Brown


  #16   Report Post  
Old May 21st 19, 01:17 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Mar 2017
Posts: 98
Default Phone charger question

On 20/05/2019 19:18, MissRiaElaine wrote:
On 20/05/2019 18:19, Graham. wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting.* Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe?* I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find).* The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not.* It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine.* Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up?* Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?



It's not unreasonable to be a little paranoid about this issue, the
following is chiefly about UK plugs and sockets.

The plug on every item we connect to the mains has to contain a
suitably rated fuse accessible to the user, but for some reason
wall-warts are exempt, so we have to take them on trust to have
suitable internal protection.

After all, when you plug your charger into a so-called 13A socket, it
is typically protected by a 32 amp breaker and therefore capable of
supplying about 7.5kW continuously.


That's something that has always worried me more than a little. I tend
to use a 4-way strip to power my chargers, at least that has a fused plug.


But unless you swap the fuse to a 3A one it will happily supply 26A for
several minutes before it blows. I know this because our local church
has managed in the past to melt extension cables by running two kettles
from one that is still rolled up until it melted internally. The fuse
was still OK since the building ELCB went first on earth leakage.

All our extension cables now include a thermal cutout. The warning
sticker never to use them with the cable still coiled up goes unheeded

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #17   Report Post  
Old May 21st 19, 03:01 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Nov 2010
Posts: 498
Default Phone charger question

On Tue, 21 May 2019 14:17:09 +0100, Martin Brown
wrote:

On 20/05/2019 19:18, MissRiaElaine wrote:
On 20/05/2019 18:19, Graham. wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting.* Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe?* I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find).* The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not.* It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine.* Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up?* Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?


It's not unreasonable to be a little paranoid about this issue, the
following is chiefly about UK plugs and sockets.

The plug on every item we connect to the mains has to contain a
suitably rated fuse accessible to the user, but for some reason
wall-warts are exempt, so we have to take them on trust to have
suitable internal protection.

After all, when you plug your charger into a so-called 13A socket, it
is typically protected by a 32 amp breaker and therefore capable of
supplying about 7.5kW continuously.


That's something that has always worried me more than a little. I tend
to use a 4-way strip to power my chargers, at least that has a fused plug.


But unless you swap the fuse to a 3A one it will happily supply 26A for
several minutes before it blows. I know this because our local church
has managed in the past to melt extension cables by running two kettles
from one that is still rolled up until it melted internally. The fuse
was still OK since the building ELCB went first on earth leakage.

Could you get a faster blowing fuse, or would that be a different
size? I thought the glass ones blew faster.
  #18   Report Post  
Old May 21st 19, 03:18 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Jul 2018
Posts: 164
Default Phone charger question

On 21/05/2019 14:17, Martin Brown wrote:
On 20/05/2019 19:18, MissRiaElaine wrote:
On 20/05/2019 18:19, Graham. wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting.* Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe?* I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find).* The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not.* It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine.* Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up?* Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?


It's not unreasonable to be a little paranoid about this issue, the
following is chiefly about UK plugs and sockets.

The plug on every item we connect to the mains has to contain a
suitably rated fuse accessible to the user, but for some reason
wall-warts are exempt, so we have to take them on trust to have
suitable internal protection.

After all, when you plug your charger into a so-called 13A socket, it
is typically protected by a 32 amp breaker and therefore capable of
supplying about 7.5kW continuously.


That's something that has always worried me more than a little. I tend
to use a 4-way strip to power my chargers, at least that has a fused
plug.


But unless you swap the fuse to a 3A one it will happily supply 26A for
several minutes before it blows. I know this because our local church
has managed in the past to melt extension cables by running two kettles
from one that is still rolled up until it melted internally. The fuse
was still OK since the building ELCB went first on earth leakage.


Actually, a 1A fuse. The strip is clearly labelled CHARGERS ONLY.

I have another normally-fused strip for plugging laptops and hair dryers
etc. in.

--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
  #19   Report Post  
Old May 21st 19, 06:40 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: May 2018
Posts: 21
Default Phone charger question

In message
Scott wrote:

Could you get a faster blowing fuse, or would that be a different
size? I thought the glass ones blew faster.


The trouble is that we wouold all like a fuse that will carry its rated
maximum current for ever, but blow fairly soon when called upon to pass
a current slightly over the rating.

With a hot wire as the active element, that's impossible. The wire has
to melt when the overload current passes, which means it'll already be
close to melting point when the rated current passes. Which means that
the element will oxidise over a period of days or weeks at maximum
current, and therefore blow unexpectedly.

David
  #20   Report Post  
Old May 21st 19, 06:49 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Nov 2010
Posts: 498
Default Phone charger question

On Tue, 21 May 2019 19:40:44 +0100, David Higton
wrote:

In message
Scott wrote:

Could you get a faster blowing fuse, or would that be a different
size? I thought the glass ones blew faster.


The trouble is that we wouold all like a fuse that will carry its rated
maximum current for ever, but blow fairly soon when called upon to pass
a current slightly over the rating.

With a hot wire as the active element, that's impossible. The wire has
to melt when the overload current passes, which means it'll already be
close to melting point when the rated current passes. Which means that
the element will oxidise over a period of days or weeks at maximum
current, and therefore blow unexpectedly.

Thanks. Worst case scenario then. If the charger burst into flames
would this ensure a fuse somewhere (either in the plug or at the
consumer unit) would trip? Would a burning charger set fire to a
wall?

I assume the RCD / RCBO would not trip as there would be no leakage to
earth?

vid


Reply
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
FS: Genuine Motorola USB data cable + car charger + desktop charger for Timeport 280 and others Ian Marketplace 0 April 24th 04 09:07 AM
Swap Trium mars bar+Charger for a T68i Charger G Marketplace 0 January 21st 04 06:12 PM
FS: Genuine Nokia car charger & battery & desktop battery charger Ian Marketplace 0 October 3rd 03 09:24 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:40 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 Mobile Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about UK mobile phones"

 

Copyright © 2017