UK Mobile Phones (uk.telecom.mobile) Mobile telephone equipment and networks.

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Old May 19th 19, 08:44 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Default Phone charger question

Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting. Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe? I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find). The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not. It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine. Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up? Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?

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Old May 19th 19, 12:38 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Default Phone charger question

Scott wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting. Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe? I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find). The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not. It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine. Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up? Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?


I don’t think so. It is trivial to fake the outer case markings (though
they sometimes get that wrong!). Most supplies are tightly sealed shut, so
you can’t take the lid off to look inside. If you are dealing with Apple
stuff, and I assume you are given the reference to an Apple technician, the
easiest solution is to take it to the Apple shop and pay £8 to have it
swapped with a known good Apple unit from their stock. With power supplies
you have to have confidence in the supply chain and/or brand. It’s a bit
like why the likes of Sainsbury’s sprang up in Victorian times, so that
customers could have confidence that goods in their shops had not been
adulterated because of the need to preserve Sainsbury’s reputation. The
food might have been a bit more expensive than the local corner shop, but
you had greater confidence in what you were getting. I know I might sound a
bit paranoid on this subject, but just consider that within the very small
volume of your charger you have 230v mains one side, normally fused at 32A
in the ring circuit, and around 5v on the output. Designed and constructed
properly it is not a problem. The trouble is properly is a lot harder than
it first appears, and even harder if your bill of materials budget is half
a farthing.

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Old May 19th 19, 03:04 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Posts: 498
Default Phone charger question

On Sun, 19 May 2019 12:38:50 +0000 (UTC), Tweed
wrote:

Scott wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting. Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe? I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find). The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not. It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine. Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up? Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?


I dont think so. It is trivial to fake the outer case markings (though
they sometimes get that wrong!). Most supplies are tightly sealed shut, so
you cant take the lid off to look inside. If you are dealing with Apple
stuff, and I assume you are given the reference to an Apple technician, the
easiest solution is to take it to the Apple shop and pay 8 to have it
swapped with a known good Apple unit from their stock. With power supplies
you have to have confidence in the supply chain and/or brand. Its a bit
like why the likes of Sainsburys sprang up in Victorian times, so that
customers could have confidence that goods in their shops had not been
adulterated because of the need to preserve Sainsburys reputation. The
food might have been a bit more expensive than the local corner shop, but
you had greater confidence in what you were getting. I know I might sound a
bit paranoid on this subject, but just consider that within the very small
volume of your charger you have 230v mains one side, normally fused at 32A
in the ring circuit, and around 5v on the output. Designed and constructed
properly it is not a problem. The trouble is properly is a lot harder than
it first appears, and even harder if your bill of materials budget is half
a farthing.


Thanks. I considered that but the problem it that it's a two pin
(Euro) version not sold in the UK that I wanted for travel purposes.
Maybe I could swap it at the destination for 10 Euro or something. .

By strange coincidence, I bought a packed salad from Sainsbury's
yesterday and it smelt utterly rotten like some industrial chemical.

I might sound a bit paranoid too but the supplier has a feedback for
supplying counterfeits BUT all the indications including inspection by
an Apple technician is that it is genuine. The suppler says it came
straight out of an Apple box but maybe the box was counterfeit too?
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Old May 19th 19, 03:49 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Posts: 98
Default Phone charger question

On 19/05/2019 16:04, Scott wrote:
On Sun, 19 May 2019 12:38:50 +0000 (UTC), Tweed
wrote:

Scott wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting. Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe? I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find). The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not. It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine. Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up? Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?


I don’t think so. It is trivial to fake the outer case markings (though
they sometimes get that wrong!). Most supplies are tightly sealed shut, so
you can’t take the lid off to look inside. If you are dealing with Apple
stuff, and I assume you are given the reference to an Apple technician, the
easiest solution is to take it to the Apple shop and pay £8 to have it
swapped with a known good Apple unit from their stock. With power supplies
you have to have confidence in the supply chain and/or brand. It’s a bit
like why the likes of Sainsbury’s sprang up in Victorian times, so that
customers could have confidence that goods in their shops had not been
adulterated because of the need to preserve Sainsbury’s reputation. The
food might have been a bit more expensive than the local corner shop, but
you had greater confidence in what you were getting. I know I might sound a
bit paranoid on this subject, but just consider that within the very small
volume of your charger you have 230v mains one side, normally fused at 32A
in the ring circuit, and around 5v on the output. Designed and constructed
properly it is not a problem. The trouble is properly is a lot harder than
it first appears, and even harder if your bill of materials budget is half
a farthing.


Thanks. I considered that but the problem it that it's a two pin
(Euro) version not sold in the UK that I wanted for travel purposes.
Maybe I could swap it at the destination for 10 Euro or something. .


It may be easier to buy one at the destination or rely on hotels having
USB charge points in the rooms. Many of them do these days. Then you can
get away with just carrying the leads. I have one that can be any.

I might sound a bit paranoid too but the supplier has a feedback for
supplying counterfeits BUT all the indications including inspection by
an Apple technician is that it is genuine. The suppler says it came
straight out of an Apple box but maybe the box was counterfeit too?


The main thing is do not use it in the bath or immerse it in water.

The only problems with chargers I have ever seen is charger fails
completely or cannot deliver enough current to charge certain power
hungry devices when their display and CPU is active. It will still
charger overnight even if it grizzles "warning slow charge".

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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Old May 19th 19, 07:08 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Posts: 534
Default Phone charger question

Martin Brown wrote:
On 19/05/2019 16:04, Scott wrote:
On Sun, 19 May 2019 12:38:50 +0000 (UTC), Tweed
wrote:

Scott wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting. Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe? I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find). The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not. It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine. Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up? Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?


I don’t think so. It is trivial to fake the outer case markings (though
they sometimes get that wrong!). Most supplies are tightly sealed shut, so
you can’t take the lid off to look inside. If you are dealing with Apple
stuff, and I assume you are given the reference to an Apple technician, the
easiest solution is to take it to the Apple shop and pay £8 to have it
swapped with a known good Apple unit from their stock. With power supplies
you have to have confidence in the supply chain and/or brand. It’s a bit
like why the likes of Sainsbury’s sprang up in Victorian times, so that
customers could have confidence that goods in their shops had not been
adulterated because of the need to preserve Sainsbury’s reputation. The
food might have been a bit more expensive than the local corner shop, but
you had greater confidence in what you were getting. I know I might sound a
bit paranoid on this subject, but just consider that within the very small
volume of your charger you have 230v mains one side, normally fused at 32A
in the ring circuit, and around 5v on the output. Designed and constructed
properly it is not a problem. The trouble is properly is a lot harder than
it first appears, and even harder if your bill of materials budget is half
a farthing.


Thanks. I considered that but the problem it that it's a two pin
(Euro) version not sold in the UK that I wanted for travel purposes.
Maybe I could swap it at the destination for 10 Euro or something. .


It may be easier to buy one at the destination


Yep. Cheaper too. I've got a few I've bought over the years.

Adapters are fine but add bulk to the plug which may cause problems
plugging it in. Especially in the US as their sockets are really flimsy.

or rely on hotels having
USB charge points in the rooms. Many of them do these days.


Too many hotels don't which it makes it quite a risky exercise.




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Old May 19th 19, 08:06 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Default Phone charger question

On 19/05/2019 20:08, Chris wrote:
Martin Brown wrote:


or rely on hotels having
USB charge points in the rooms. Many of them do these days.


Too many hotels don't which it makes it quite a risky exercise.


I've only been in one recently (a Travelodge, of all places) that has
USB socket. Not enough mains sockets though, fortunately I always take a
4-way power strip.


--
Ria in Aberdeen

[Send address is invalid, use sipsoup at gmail dot com to reply direct]
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Old May 19th 19, 08:26 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Posts: 498
Default Phone charger question

On Sun, 19 May 2019 19:08:34 -0000 (UTC), Chris
wrote:

Martin Brown wrote:
On 19/05/2019 16:04, Scott wrote:
On Sun, 19 May 2019 12:38:50 +0000 (UTC), Tweed
wrote:

Scott wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting. Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe? I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find). The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not. It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine. Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up? Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?


I dont think so. It is trivial to fake the outer case markings (though
they sometimes get that wrong!). Most supplies are tightly sealed shut, so
you cant take the lid off to look inside. If you are dealing with Apple
stuff, and I assume you are given the reference to an Apple technician, the
easiest solution is to take it to the Apple shop and pay 8 to have it
swapped with a known good Apple unit from their stock. With power supplies
you have to have confidence in the supply chain and/or brand. Its a bit
like why the likes of Sainsburys sprang up in Victorian times, so that
customers could have confidence that goods in their shops had not been
adulterated because of the need to preserve Sainsburys reputation. The
food might have been a bit more expensive than the local corner shop, but
you had greater confidence in what you were getting. I know I might sound a
bit paranoid on this subject, but just consider that within the very small
volume of your charger you have 230v mains one side, normally fused at 32A
in the ring circuit, and around 5v on the output. Designed and constructed
properly it is not a problem. The trouble is properly is a lot harder than
it first appears, and even harder if your bill of materials budget is half
a farthing.

Thanks. I considered that but the problem it that it's a two pin
(Euro) version not sold in the UK that I wanted for travel purposes.
Maybe I could swap it at the destination for 10 Euro or something. .


It may be easier to buy one at the destination


Yep. Cheaper too. I've got a few I've bought over the years.

Adapters are fine but add bulk to the plug which may cause problems
plugging it in. Especially in the US as their sockets are really flimsy.

or rely on hotels having
USB charge points in the rooms. Many of them do these days.


Too many hotels don't which it makes it quite a risky exercise.

Is there any concern about voltage regulation on a USB port? The
manufacturers usually advise using the correct power supply for the
device.
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Old May 19th 19, 10:17 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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First recorded activity by MobileBanter: Dec 2015
Posts: 103
Default Phone charger question

Scott wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting. Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe? I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find). The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not. It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine. Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up? Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?


There are some guides for spotting fakes online - things like the quality of
the printing might not be so good, or the plastic finish not quite up to
standard.

Counterfeits often work but corners have been cut on the construction. In
particular, the most dangerous ones have very little separation between
mains and low voltage sides. These are not the kind of things you can check
without tearing it apart.

Theo
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Old May 20th 19, 08:32 AM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Posts: 498
Default Phone charger question

On 19 May 2019 23:17:04 +0100 (BST), Theo
wrote:

Scott wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting. Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe? I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find). The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not. It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine. Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up? Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?


There are some guides for spotting fakes online - things like the quality of
the printing might not be so good, or the plastic finish not quite up to
standard.

Counterfeits often work but corners have been cut on the construction. In
particular, the most dangerous ones have very little separation between
mains and low voltage sides. These are not the kind of things you can check
without tearing it apart.

Thanks. I have found them. The combination of tiny print, my
eyesight and not knowing what to look for in terms of matte finish
make it impossible to be sure. All the indications are that it is
genuine, which means there are no obvious signs. As it's non UK I
cannot (at the moment) get a genuine product as a comparator. I
actually think it's fine !!!
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Old May 20th 19, 01:14 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Posts: 534
Default Phone charger question

Scott wrote:
On Sun, 19 May 2019 19:08:34 -0000 (UTC), Chris
wrote:

Martin Brown wrote:
On 19/05/2019 16:04, Scott wrote:
On Sun, 19 May 2019 12:38:50 +0000 (UTC), Tweed
wrote:

Scott wrote:
Sorry this is a rehash of an earlier posting. Is there a way of
testing a charger to make sure it is safe? I bought one online (two
pin version so difficult to find). The seller's feedback suggests it
may be counterfeit but actually all the indications are that it is
not. It seems to have the right markings and the Apple technician
thinks it is almost certainly genuine. Is there a conclusive test
without opening it up? Best of all, is there an app for checking the
charger?


I don’t think so. It is trivial to fake the outer case markings (though
they sometimes get that wrong!). Most supplies are tightly sealed shut, so
you can’t take the lid off to look inside. If you are dealing with Apple
stuff, and I assume you are given the reference to an Apple technician, the
easiest solution is to take it to the Apple shop and pay £8 to have it
swapped with a known good Apple unit from their stock. With power supplies
you have to have confidence in the supply chain and/or brand. It’s a bit
like why the likes of Sainsbury’s sprang up in Victorian times, so that
customers could have confidence that goods in their shops had not been
adulterated because of the need to preserve Sainsbury’s reputation. The
food might have been a bit more expensive than the local corner shop, but
you had greater confidence in what you were getting. I know I might sound a
bit paranoid on this subject, but just consider that within the very small
volume of your charger you have 230v mains one side, normally fused at 32A
in the ring circuit, and around 5v on the output. Designed and constructed
properly it is not a problem. The trouble is properly is a lot harder than
it first appears, and even harder if your bill of materials budget is half
a farthing.

Thanks. I considered that but the problem it that it's a two pin
(Euro) version not sold in the UK that I wanted for travel purposes.
Maybe I could swap it at the destination for 10 Euro or something. .

It may be easier to buy one at the destination


Yep. Cheaper too. I've got a few I've bought over the years.

Adapters are fine but add bulk to the plug which may cause problems
plugging it in. Especially in the US as their sockets are really flimsy.

or rely on hotels having
USB charge points in the rooms. Many of them do these days.


Too many hotels don't which it makes it quite a risky exercise.

Is there any concern about voltage regulation on a USB port? The
manufacturers usually advise using the correct power supply for the
device.


Not so far...

I'm fairly unfussy when it comes to charging my phone and it's been fine.
Occasionally they're a bit slow, but that's it.



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