UK Mobile Phones (uk.telecom.mobile) Mobile telephone equipment and networks.

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Old November 8th 19, 04:23 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,uk.telecom.broadband
Bev Bev is offline
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On Fri, 08 Nov 2019 16:05:28 +0000, Richard Tobin wrote:

In article ,
Bev wrote:

I ask as it is anticipated that we should be getting it also within the
next few months (once a number of trees have been cut back to permit the
fibre to be strung along the electricity poles) but reading the various
reports on the internet it seems that installation methods have changed
somewhat over time. The ideal solution, for me, would be to carry the
fibre optic cable straight through the gable wall into the loft and then
down through the ceiling into the study. This would follow the route of
the existing telephone line.

Various reports suggest that either:
this is indeed possible or that it is not and it has to terminate at a
box on the outside

Someone's recent experience would be gratefully received so that I can
begin to make my own preparations for the install.


I had FTTP installed a few months ago. The cable (which has both fibre
and copper) replaced the existing one and comes in to the house just as
the old one did, with no box on the outside.

-- Richard


Thank you Richard. I hope our install can be the same.

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Old November 8th 19, 06:22 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,uk.telecom.broadband
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In uk.telecom.broadband Bev wrote:
On Fri, 08 Nov 2019 14:43:48 +0000, Theo wrote:

I think FTTP gets used when there isn't a suitable FTTC solution. We
could have 'up to' 2Mbps ADSL on copper (3.5km from the exchange by
crow), and evidently this wasn't really good enough. So FTTP has been
strung along the same poles, providing (tiers up to) a gigabit service.


Excuse my butting in here... do you have FTTP installed to your own home
and, if so, what was the process that was followed please?


FTTP was installed when we moved in, presumably by previous occupants.

There are two cables coming from the pole:
- a regular copper line, which provides the phone services
- a fibre

The fibre is hooked up to an Openreach-branded Huawei HG612 ONT (FTTP
modem). The modem is powered from a mains socket and there's a separate
battery backup box with 4 AA NiMH cells (BYD branded). This dates the
install to a few years old since they don't provide these boxes any more.

The FTTP modem provides ethernet to the ISP's router (eg BT HomeHub), which
I think carries PPPoE. There are two analogue phone sockets on the ONT, but
we don't use these. In a local new-build there's the same box but phones
plugged in - I assume there is no copper line installed.

I ask as it is anticipated that we should be getting it also within the
next few months (once a number of trees have been cut back to permit the
fibre to be strung along the electricity poles) but reading the various
reports on the internet it seems that installation methods have changed
somewhat over time. The ideal solution, for me, would be to carry the
fibre optic cable straight through the gable wall into the loft and then
down through the ceiling into the study. This would follow the route of
the existing telephone line.

Various reports suggest that either:
this is indeed possible or
that it is not and it has to terminate at a box on the outside


Our cable route is slightly different:
- the copper line comes on a dropwire from the pole into the loft, where
there's a master socket lying on the fibreglass, from whence it's split off
into various rooms' phone sockets.
- the fibre meets the house at the same point, but runs down the wall to
about 18" off the ground, when there's a small grey box and it goes through
the wall. The ONT is mounted on the other side of the wall (next to a power
socket).

I suspect the reason for doing it this way is they don't want to joint the
fibre, as the ONT is the boundary of the Openreach network. If you were
willing to mount the ONT in the loft (providing it with power, and onward
ethernet and phone cables) that might work. You'd still have your router
in the study on the end of the ethernet.

https://superuser.com/questions/1311...our-fttp-point
(last answer) suggests a fibre coupler and patch cord have been used to
extend the Openreach fibre and allow moving the ONT. This would be
'unofficial' - you'd probably have to move it back for service callouts.

Someone's recent experience would be gratefully received so that I can
begin to make my own preparations for the install.


If you can install a handy mains socket where the ONT might go in the loft,
you might persuade them of this plan.

I don't know what current install practice is.

Theo
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Old November 9th 19, 12:17 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,uk.telecom.broadband
Bev Bev is offline
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On Fri, 08 Nov 2019 18:22:25 +0000, Theo wrote:

In uk.telecom.broadband Bev wrote:
On Fri, 08 Nov 2019 14:43:48 +0000, Theo wrote:

I think FTTP gets used when there isn't a suitable FTTC solution. We
could have 'up to' 2Mbps ADSL on copper (3.5km from the exchange by
crow), and evidently this wasn't really good enough. So FTTP has
been strung along the same poles, providing (tiers up to) a gigabit
service.


Excuse my butting in here... do you have FTTP installed to your own
home and, if so, what was the process that was followed please?


[...]

FTTP was installed when we moved in, presumably by previous occupants.

Someone's recent experience would be gratefully received so that I can
begin to make my own preparations for the install.

[...]

I don't know what current install practice is.

Noted, thanks.

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Old November 9th 19, 01:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,uk.telecom.broadband
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On 08 Nov 2019 14:43:48 +0000 (GMT), Theo
wrote:

In uk.telecom.broadband AnthonyL wrote:
Move on to about 4 years ago and the struggling ADSL was still the
best on offer from BT. Patchy 3g was around but INEEDBROADBAND came
in with a 10-20Mbps wireless. Quite expensive but there were a number
of small businesses and affluent home owners around. So what happens
shortly afterwards, no not even FTTC but FTTP. I can't even get that
in a suburb on the edge of the city!! My friends don't know what to
do with the speed ~100Mbps.

So the moral seems to be - force BT's hand by showing willing
elsewhere.

Anyone else experienced similar?


I think FTTP gets used when there isn't a suitable FTTC solution. We could
have 'up to' 2Mbps ADSL on copper (3.5km from the exchange by crow), and
evidently this wasn't really good enough. So FTTP has been strung along the
same poles, providing (tiers up to) a gigabit service.

Meanwhile the villages around are on ~30Mbps FTTC, presumably because that was
cheaper and quicker for Openreach to deploy. The 'superfast broadband' box
has now been ticked, so no need to provide them with a faster service.


The village/hamlet is basically on a single dead end street at the
start of which are the existing BT cabinets. Nothing is more than a
mile away and the cabinets themselves are about 5km (cable route) from
the exchange. The general expectation was FTTC and I imagine most
would be delighted with 20Mbps-30Mbps. Getting FTTP was somewhat a
surprise and as an outsider I'm bemused.

The households are fed from overhead as well even if the main feeds
are underground.

--
AnthonyL

Why do scientists need to BELIEVE in anything?
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Old November 9th 19, 02:03 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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On 08/11/2019 13:16, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Thursday, 7 November 2019 17:33:36 UTC, MikeS wrote:
On 07/11/2019 11:52, Java Jive wrote:
Another problem is the lack of mobile/4G routers available.


I don't understand this comment. There is a long history of such 3G
routers at reasonable cost and manufacturers such as TP-Link have an
excellent range of 4G consumer routers, either using a USB dongle or
with an embedded SIM slot.


Odd that I advised a friend's company about installing a [Teltonika] 4G router in their premises and they are very happy with it.


Mikrotik Routerboards, which use a PCIe LTE modems rather than USB dongles.

--
Mouse.
Where Morse meets House.


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Old November 9th 19, 02:34 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband,uk.telecom.mobile
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On 07/11/2019 19:52, Tweed wrote:
Java Jive wrote:
On 07/11/2019 18:10, Tweed wrote:

What’s wrong with Vodafone’s unlimited plans? £23/month speed capped at
2Mbit/second, £26/month capped at 10Mbit/sec, £30/month no speed capping.
You can get a “Gigacube” from them, which is a consumer friendly router,
though admittedly it is a bit expensive. It’s a rebadged Chinese product,
so doubtless you can get it elsewhere. Contract dearer then Three, but not
unreasonable if you can get Vodafone but not Three.


I didn't find anything meeting the criteria I gave in the open letter
when I searched the Vodaphone site a month or so ago, and the only
current plan less than £25 pcm is speed capped at roughly the speed we
already get for less via landlines around here. Also, it probably
didn't help that the site locked up my browser so I had to reload it
disallowing JavaScript, but today it seems to be working alright.


You said around £25. £26 is near enough, and £10 Mbit/sec is not that bad.
Vodafone’s unlimited offering has been around since about September.


There's also an unlimited deal with IDmobile (Three network) for £25pm
https://www.idmobile.co.uk/shop/plans/sim-only-deals

Or Smarty (also Three) for £22pm
https://smarty.co.uk/plans/unlimited

Or Voxi (Vodaphone) for £30pm
https://www.voxi.co.uk/plans

All are 30 day contracts so can ditch them if you don't like the service.
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Old November 10th 19, 04:37 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile,uk.telecom.broadband
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In uk.telecom.broadband AnthonyL wrote:
The village/hamlet is basically on a single dead end street at the
start of which are the existing BT cabinets. Nothing is more than a
mile away and the cabinets themselves are about 5km (cable route) from
the exchange. The general expectation was FTTC and I imagine most
would be delighted with 20Mbps-30Mbps. Getting FTTP was somewhat a
surprise and as an outsider I'm bemused.

The households are fed from overhead as well even if the main feeds
are underground.


If the copper is already poled, and there's only 60 premises, I could see
that stacking up for FTTP. Cheaper than having to sort out a power feed to
the cabinets and install a FTTC node to serve such a small number of
premises. They need to string fibre as far as the cabinet anyway.

I think our copper is an exchange-only line (the exchange being 3.5km down
an A road) which would make it cheaper to install FTTP than a local cabinet.

Theo
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Old November 12th 19, 01:00 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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On 08/11/2019 13:10, Java Jive wrote:
However, I'm trying to get local residents some meaningful *choice*,
hence my open letter to mobile suppliers as well.* Better mobile schemes
would be a third choice:


You have to remember it will be completely unprofitable for the mobile
provider unless someone subsidies them.

Some years ago we did a contract for one mobile network which involved
auditing all the equipment on some sites. We went to one remote site on
the West coast - I don't think there were any buildings in sight. We had
to switch off so we could pull cards out so called up their control.
The reply was that they were not bothered because there were only
####ing sheep around there to use it so no one would notice.
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Old November 12th 19, 01:34 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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On 12/11/2019 13:00, MB wrote:

On 08/11/2019 13:10, Java Jive wrote:

However, I'm trying to get local residents some meaningful *choice*,
hence my open letter to mobile suppliers as well.* Better mobile
schemes would be a third choice:


You have to remember it will be completely unprofitable for the mobile
provider unless someone subsidies them.


Nonsense, EE have to upgrade for the national emergency services
network, and others have to follow lest they lose rural custom to EE.
Hence, although coverage is a little patchy here, the only national
carrier network that still has inferior coverage, no 4G, is Three.

Given that they've got the coverage, it makes sense for them to provide
plans that enable people to use it more effectively.

Some years ago we did a contract for one mobile network which involved
auditing all the equipment on some sites.* We went to one remote site on
the West coast - I don't think there were any buildings in sight. We had
to switch off so we could pull cards out so called up their control. The
reply was that they were not bothered because there were only ####ing
sheep around there to use it so no one would notice.


That suggests an attitude problem with inexperienced but arrogant staff
at the company, rather than reality.

It sounds rather like staff at Tesco Customer Services refusing to allow
deliveries to us because their software calculates distances as the crow
flies rather than as the road winds, and so always fobbing us off by
telling us to go to Ullapool. Ullapool is indeed closer as the crow
flies, but there is a deal of the finest Scottish geography and geology
between us and there, and for fully half the distance the road is
single-track with passing places to allow vehicles travelling in
opposite directions to pass by each other! Thus not only is Dingwall
actually nearer by road, but the road is better quality, and it takes
about two-thirds, perhaps a bit less, time to drive to Dingwall as to
Ullapool. Despite this, we only finally got deliveries here when I and
another guy wrote to Head Office pointing out that their broken software
was creating postcode lotteries, and would they please get Dingwall to
deliver to us?! The result has transformed my life, no longer do I have
to spend three or four hours doing a weekly or fortnightly shop, at a
cost of about £15 in fuel, and that's LPG. Now I spend between about
£2-5 on a picking/delivery charge, and ten minutes receiving and
checking the delivery and putting the stuff away.
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Old November 12th 19, 02:44 PM posted to uk.telecom.mobile
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Java Jive wrote:

MB wrote:

You have to remember it will be completely unprofitable for the mobile
provider unless someone subsidies them.


Nonsense, EE have to upgrade for the national emergency services
network


But they don't have to give unlimited usage at a knockdown price,
Airwave isn't cheap.


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